Keep Knitting, Just Follow the Pattern

I usually post my blog entries on facebook and google+ so that more people are aware of them, which usually results in some comments from readers. I received a comment from a lady who said that she liked reading my posts, but she wasn’t a sports fan so she struggled to relate to the sport related parables. She joked and asked if next time I could do one about knitting. Challenge accepted.

When I was younger, about 10 years old, for some strange reason my mom taught us to knit. No idea why we learned that, my brother, sister and myself all knitting. I don’t remember much, only starting off with 20 stitches, dropping 5 of them, but still ending up with about 30 when I finished. I ended up with a odd shaped red mess with holes in it, not really the scarf that I intended. My mom on the other hand would follow complicated patterns, mix wool types and colours and use different stitch types in order to create amazing woollen products. I bet you’re wondering what I am possibly going to teach from this. Well, here goes.

I have been watching a fair share of God Channel of late, as well as reading various blog posts about Christianity and following God. Every preacher, teacher, blogger have their ‘pet’ topics which they love to teach or preach about. I have no issue with this, that is why we need various teachers, so that we can get a well rounded view of what the bible says. Think of all of these ministries as balls of wool. All different types, fullness, feel and colour. Too much of one could get boring and monotonous, but mixing a few together, could allow you to be much more versatile and get a better finished product. Am I talking about the wool or the ministries here? Both. We need to hear as many points of view that we can, however we need to be aware. Just like steel wool is also a ‘wool’, it won’t work in a knitting pattern. There are some ministries out there that are the ‘steel wool in the wool pile’. Be careful of these. How do you know which is which? This brings me to my favourite part of this post!

Continuing with the knitting theme, what would the word (bible) be? The pattern! Acts 17:11-12 says, “And the people of Berea were more open-minded than those in Thessalonica, and they listened eagerly to Paul’s message. They searched the Scriptures day after day to see if Paul and Silas were teaching the truth. As a result, many Jews believed, as did many of the prominent Greek women and men.” The bible is the pattern, without it, you can have all of the wool that you like, but you’ll never have the finished article. I have some of my favourite ministers, and I even have some ‘pet’ topics of my own which you’ll find here in my blog, they ALL need to be weighed up against scripture before believed. Everyone who teaches scripture at the moment are human, and they can all make mistakes. Even if they get everything right, there is so much to learn in the bible, that no-one can cover it all.

So what does this mean for me? Here goes the explanation, I’m going to mix up the ministry and kitting metaphors, so try and keep up. Go out there and collect as many ‘balls of wool’ that you can, while avoiding the ‘steel wool’, pick up the ‘pattern’ as often as you can and make sure that you are familiar with it, so that you understand what you are trying to ‘knit’. Carefully select the correct ‘wool’ for that part of the ‘pattern’ and get actively ‘knitting’. Don’t give up until the ‘garment’ is complete! Along the way, why don’t you help others to ‘knit’ by providing more quality ‘wool’ for them to use with the ‘pattern’ in their own creating. And just like my mom did, let’s all encourage others to ‘knit’.. Just remember to stress the importance of the ‘pattern’!

I hope that this is not too confusing and that you all understand. We may have to get the lady that requested the knitting parable to explain 😉

Keep ‘knitting’!

Richard

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2 thoughts on “Keep Knitting, Just Follow the Pattern

  1. You funny man, you. Nice post, and it’s good to see that your mother did the right thing and taught you to knit — it’s like driving a car, and you’ll never forget it.

    You know what I like about knitting? It’s highly individual, and people knit what, and how, they want. As I type this, I’m wearing socks that I knit — I have a couple dozen I’ve created, bit by bit, over the years. Oh, and I knit the sweater I’m wearing, too. And the hat — lots of different items of differing levels of difficulty (and using different textiles as well), and although hand knitting is slow, when you keep at it steadily, you eventually build up a supply of finished projects. Because I’ve knit so much, I can follow the pattern, and change it, and still result with something wearable.

    And yet, not too long ago, someone told me that I don’t “knit right.” Basically what she meant is that I don’t knit the way she does, but as long as what you turn out looks like a knit stitch, it doesn’t matter how you create it.

    You know, one could go on and on about knitting, and its application to life and spirituality (so much more interesting than football!) I’m glad you took up the challenge, and encourage you to pick up the needles again and honor your mother’s efforts to show you a versatile and satisfying artisan craft. — Carolyn

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    1. Thanks for your comment Carolyn, glad you enjoyed it. My mom used to start it off for us and finish it (casting on and off if I remember correctly) and we just did the bit in between.. What took me weeks to do my mom could do in hours.. Anyhow, more interesting than football.. I’m not sure, it was a good way to get my point across. Thanks for the challenge!

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